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    “Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512. Contiene sotto Compendio: De tutti li circuli: et sphere celeste …. Nota: quo Modo: et Personis: versus Mare indicum: repetra fuerit Navigatio. Et que Insule alias Incognite inuente fuerint a Genuensi Columbo. Necnon et Terra firma nostcrorum Antecessorum Nemini Cognita.”. Autograph manuscript. Monastery of St. Mary Magdalene at Monterossa al Mare, dated February 10 to April 15, 1512

    This IMPORTANT CODEX OF THE AGE OF DISCOVERY is an unpublished source for the history of exploration in the New World. The author, the Benedictine monk Bernardus of Albenga, consulted Columbus’s friend and shipmate Michele de Cuneo in the preparation of this manuscript.

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    The Federalist: a collection of essays written in favor of the new constitution. New York: John and Andrew M’Lean, 1788

    First edition of The Federalist, the most sought-after of all American books. An exceptional copy in the original boards, with the edges untrimmed. A splendid association copy from the library of Major Roger Alden, whom George Washington entrusted with the original manuscript of the Constitution.



    The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles: with the names of the Adventurers, Planters, and Governours from their first beginning Ano: 1584 to this present 1626.. London: J. D.[awson] and I. H.[aviland] for Michael Sparkes, 1627

    First edition, third issue. This is an outstanding copy of a foundational work of American history, from the library of the Calverts, the original Proprietors and colonial governors of Maryland.



    Common Sense; Addressed to the Inhabitants of America . . . the third edition [bound with:] Large Additions to Common Sense. Philadelphia: R. Bell, 1776

    FIRST EDITION, FIRST PRINTING sheets of Common Sense, here with the third edition title page and prefatory leaf. “It is not too much to say that the Declaration of Independence of July 7, 1776, was due more to Paine’s Common Sense than to any other single piece of writing” (Streeter).



    Illustrated autograph manuscript journal of his tour of the United States, including the Indian Territories and Dodge City. England to the United States and back, 22 September 1877 to 8 March 1878

    This tremendous illustrated manuscript journal details Markham’s adventures in the Old West. His journey takes him from Liverpool to New York by Cunard steamer, then to Wisconsin to see his mother, who had emigrated there, and on to St Louis. He continues into Indian Territory, travelling by rail and then stage to Fort Sill. For four weeks, accompanied by two Indians, he hunts buffalo and cougar, wolves and turkeys. His journal is filled with fascinating stories of his interactions with Indians and his adventures and misadventures on the prairie. He then makes his way, with the assistance of the Caddoc Indians, to Camp Supply, from which he took the stagecoach to Dodge City. Approaching Dodge he was joined by a party of “cow boys” armed with “six shooters,” and he stayed with them at the camping site outside Dodge City known as Soldiers’ Graves, or Bear Creek, Station.



    Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord, April 19, 1775. Concord, Massachusetts, October 1774,

    AN ICONIC RELIC OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. Minuteman Oliver Buttrick carried this historic powder horn at the Battle of Concord, the first battle of the American Revolutionary War.



    The photographic archive, papers, and relics of William Kennoch, Secret Service Agent. Various places, 1870s and 1880s

    This unique and unpublished archive of Secret Service Agent William Kennoch includes more than 1000 cartes de visite of counterfeiters, con men, federal fugitives, and other criminals and lowlifes. The collection also includes important papers, printed ephemera, and relics of Kennoch’s life and career.

    the collection: $150,000


    Ambrotype Portrait of John D. Rockefeller. Cleveland, Ohio: Wiliam C. North, c. 1857-1858

    This famous portrait of John D. Rockefeller at age 18 is the earliest known photograph of the greatest titan of American business and industry.



    History of the Indian Tribes of North America. With biographical sketches and anecdotes of the principal chiefs. Philadelphia: Greenough [and] Rice & Clark, [1838-1844]

    A handsome set, with original wrappers, of this landmark of American publishing history, “one of the most costly and important ever published on the American Indians”



    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Written by Himself. Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1845

    FIRST EDITION of one of the great American autobiographies. Extremely rare presentation copy inscribed by Douglass: “To Miss Adeline Henshaw from her Friend Frederick Douglass, 11th July, 1845.”

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