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  • (MAGNA CARTA.) Care, Henry, ed

    English Liberties, Or The Free-Born Subject’s Inheritance: Containing Magna Charta . . . The Habeas Corpus Act, And Several Other Statutes. Boston: Printed by J. Franklin, for N. Buttolph, B. Eliot, and D. Henchman, 1721

    FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. This volume, one of the very first law books printed in colonial America, contains the first American printing of Magna Carta and other fundamental documents of individual liberty in Anglo-American law. Magna Carta has become “a sacred text, the nearest approach to an irrepealable ‘fundamental statute’ that England has ever had” (Pollock & Maitland)

    $20,000

  • (HEBREW.)

    Women’s Manuscript Prayer Book in Hebrew. Scribe: Yechiel Menachem Ben Abraham Urbino. Italy, 1775

    This delicate and rare manuscript, prepared exclusively for women includes prayers for healthy and righteous children, a comfortable livelihood, the Mikveh, pregnancy, candle lightening, and the separation of Challah.

    $15,000

  • RAND, AYN

    Atlas Shrugged. New York: Random House, 1957

    FIRST EDITION. Presentation copy of one of the most popular and influential books of the 20th century.

    $11,000

  • SAMUELSON, PAUL

    Economics: An Introductory Analysis.. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1948

    First edition of the greatest and most influential modern economics text-book. Inscribed by Samuelson for Eric Roll. Roll, professor of economics and later chairman of S. G. Warburg & Co., wrote the classic History of Economic Thought (1938, 4th ed., 1973).

    $8,500

  • KEYNES, JOHN MAYNARD

    General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money. London, 1936

    FIRST EDITION of this classic of modern economics, “on which his fame as the outstanding economist of his generation must rest” (DNB). World-wide depression induced Keynes to re-examine classical approaches to economics. Urging the use of a national budget as a principal instrument of the planning of the national economy, Keynes placed responsibility for regulation of the economy squarely in the hands of the government.

    $7,200

  • MALTHUS, THOMAS ROBERT

    An Essay on the Principle of Population; or, a View of its Past and Present Effects on Human Happiness; with an Inquiry into our Prospects Respecting the Future Removal or Mitigation of the Evils which it Occasions.. London: J. Johnson, 1803

    Second edition, expanded to four times the length of the 1798 edition. This is the first edition to have Malthus’s name on the title and the first to present data supporting his argument that population increases geometrically while food increases only arithmetically.

    $7,200

  • SMITH, ADAM

    An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. London: Strahan and Cadell, 1791

    SIXTH EDITION of the most important book in the history of economics. One of 2000 sets. The sixth edition is the first to have been published after Smith’s death in 1790.

    $6,800

  • SMITH, ADAM

    An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations … the third edition, with additions. London: Strahan and Cadell, 1784

    THIRD EDITION of the most important book in the history of economics. Only 1000 sets were printed.

    $6,200

  • (WASHINGTON, BUSHROD.) [Ballow, Henry.]

    A Treatise of Equity … with the addition of marginal references and notes by John Fonblanque. Volume the Second. Dublin: Byrne, Moore, Jones, and Watts, 1795

    Bushrod Washington’s copy, with his signature on the title-page. George Washington’s favorite nephew, Bushrod (1762-1829) was executor of his uncle’s estate and inherited Mount Vernon. He inherited Washington’s library and papers, and this volume was surely shelved side-by-side with those books at Mount Vernon. Bushrod Washington gave John Marshall access to Washington’s papers when the chief justice was writing his Life of Washington.

    $6,000

  • HAMILTON, ALEXANDER, et al

    The Speeches at Full Length of Mr. Van Ness, Mr. Caines, the Attorney-General, Mr. Harrison, and General Hamilton, in the great cause of the people, against Harry Croswell, on an indictment for a libel on Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States. New York: Waite, 1804

    FIRST EDITION.  Angered by attacks on his administration by Federalist newspapers, Thomas Jefferson decided to use the Sedition Act to “restore the integrity of the press.”  (Jefferson had previously attacked the Adams administration’s use of the Sedition Act to silence its enemies.)  Jefferson encouraged selective prosecutions, one of which became a landmark in First Amendment history.  Harry Croswell’s The Wasp accused Jefferson of paying pamphleteer James Callender to charge Washington and Adams with various crimes and to refer to Adams as a “hoary-headed incendiary” and Washington as a “traitor, robber, and perjurer.”  In Croswell’s trial for seditious libel, the judge ruled that the truth was not a defense.

    $5,500