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  • Hawthorne, Nathaniel

    Autograph letter signed [to Henry Arthur Bright]. Brunswick, 7 January 1854

    $4,500

  • Hawthorne, Nathaniel

    Our Old Home: A Series of English Sketches. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1863

    $4,500

  • Cooper, James Fenimore

    Autograph manuscript signed headed “Extract from ‘Bravo,’. Paris, 16 June 1831

    A passage from Cooper’s The Bravo, A Venetian Story. Cooper likely wrote out this extended passage from The Bravo for an unknown admirer. Cooper identifies it at the foot of the page as “Chapter VI. vol. I. copied from proof sheet…” The manuscript varies in several places from the text of the novel’s first publication in 1831.

    $4,500

  • WHITMAN, WALT

    Democratic Vistas. Washington, D.C: [Printed for J. S. Redfield, New York], 1871

    FIRST EDITION. One of about 500 copies.

    $4,200

  • Holmes, Oliver Wendell

    Autograph manuscript signed from “Urania” including excerpts from the original manuscript. No Place, ca. 1846

    $3,600

  • Holmes, Oliver Wendell

    Soundings from the Atlantic.. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1864

    $3,600

  • DICKENS, CHARLES

    Works. Chapman and Hall, [1870s]

    A very handsome set of the famous “Illustrated Library Edition,” here in an early printing. The dedication at the front of the first volume (Pickwick Papers) states, “This the best edition of my books is, of right, inscribed to my dear friend John Forster, biographer of Oliver Goldsmith, in affectionate acknowledgment of his counsel, sympathy, and faithful friendship during my whole literary life.” “The Library Edition came about largely because of the suggestion of Forster that while Dickens’s works were available in volumes in the Cheap Edition and in reprints of the serial parts, there was no high-quality edition that would appeal to the wealthy. Dickens eventually came round to the idea that an elegant edition could raise the stature of his writings.

    $3,500

  • Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth

    Hyperion: A Romance. New York: Samuel Colman, 1839

    Hyperion is one of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s first published works. It was published in 1839, and is a prose romance that follows a young American named Paul Flemming as he travels through Germany. The journey of the character is partially inspired by the death of a friend, and the romance in the tale is based on Longfellow’s own failed marriage proposals to his beloved.

    $3,500

  • WHITMAN, WALT

    Leaves of Grass. New York: [for Walt Whitman], 1867

    This is the fourth Leaves of Grass. The failure of Thayer & Eldridge, publisher of the third edition (Boston, 1860), left Whitman in search of a publisher. The poet decided that the events of the Civil War called for another reimagining of Leaves of Grass. Whitman returned to his earlier practice and financed the publication himself, engaging the New York printer William E. Chapin. For the first time, the 1867 Leaves opened with the poem “Inscription,” which introduced the book in subsequent editions.

    $3,500

  • WHITTIER, JOHN GREENLEAF

    Autograph letter signed to “My dear Friend.”. Danvers, March 28, 1882

    Whittier poignantly writes, “Thy word of sympathy in view of the death of dear Longfellow was very welcome. It is a mighty loss to us all. It leaves me with a feeling of loneliness, as if I had outlived the world. …. All English-speaking people have a common interest in the great world-singer. I am very truly thy friend John G. Whittier.”

    $3,200