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  • (TWAIN, MARK, ANDREW CARNEGIE, THOMAS EDISON, et al.)

    Engineers Club Inaugural Banquet Commemorative of the Opening of the New Club House on which occasion Mr. Andrew Carnegie will be the guest of honor Monday, the ninth of December 1907. [New York: Engineer's Club], [1907]

    Signed by Mark Twain, Thomas Edison, and Andrew Carnegie (who has signed twice), and others. This event commemorated the opening of the Engineers Club’s fabulous new home at 32 West 40th Street on Bryant Park in New York.

    $12,000

  • (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES

    A Trip to the Moon. New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893

    Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon. This classic of science fiction, turned into scientific fact by Armstrong and the Apollo 11 mission, was first published as De la Terre à la Lune in 1865.

    $10,000

  • BENJAMIN, ASHER

    The American Builder’s Companion; or, a new system of architecture particularly adapted to the present style of building in the United States of America. Boston: Etheridge and Bliss, 1806

    First edition of the second book by Asher Benjamin, America’s first great writer on architecture.

    $10,000

  • (D-DAY.) ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Teletype covering the Normandy landings on D-Day. Associated Press, 5 and 6 June 1944

    First announcement of the D-Day landings, perhaps the most important event of the 20th century.

    $9,500

  • (TREASURY.) Meredith, Samuel, Treasurer of the U.S

    A Collection of Three Reports on the Treasury’s Receipts and Expenditures. Philadelphia: Childs and Swaine, 1790-1793

    A collection of rare Treasury reports on the finances of the United States during its earliest years.

     

     

    3 items: $8,500

  • VERMONT

    The Vermont State House. Vermont, [c. 1859]

    A fine salt print of the Vermont State House.

    $7,000

  • GOODSPEED’S BOOK SHOP

    An enormous run of Goodspeed’s rare book and manuscript catalogues. Vols. 1-360 and 391-575. Boston: Goodspeed's Book Shop, 1899-1973

    Founded in 1898, Goodspeed’s published its first catalogue in 1899. For decades to come the firm would be a dominant force in American bookselling. These catalogues are a witness to that golden age.

    $6,500

  • JEFFERSON, THOMAS

    The Writings of Thomas Jefferson … [edited by] Henry A. Washington. Washington: Taylor & Maury, 1853-54

    FIRST EDITION of Jefferson’s writings to attempt to be comprehensive, including his principal essays, papers, and correspondence. This standard edition supersedes the four-volume edition of 1829. Includes a folding facsimile of Jefferson’s original four-page draft of the Declaration of Independence.

    $6,500

  • (WASHINGTON, BUSHROD.) [Ballow, Henry.]

    A Treatise of Equity … with the addition of marginal references and notes by John Fonblanque. Volume the Second. Dublin: Byrne, Moore, Jones, and Watts, 1795

    Bushrod Washington’s copy, with his signature on the title-page. George Washington’s favorite nephew, Bushrod (1762-1829) was executor of his uncle’s estate and inherited Mount Vernon. He inherited Washington’s library and papers, and this volume was surely shelved side-by-side with those books at Mount Vernon. Bushrod Washington gave John Marshall access to Washington’s papers when the chief justice was writing his Life of Washington.

    $6,000

  • HAMILTON, ALEXANDER, et al

    The Speeches at Full Length of Mr. Van Ness, Mr. Caines, the Attorney-General, Mr. Harrison, and General Hamilton, in the great cause of the people, against Harry Croswell, on an indictment for a libel on Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States. New York: Waite, 1804

    FIRST EDITION.  Angered by attacks on his administration by Federalist newspapers, Thomas Jefferson decided to use the Sedition Act to “restore the integrity of the press.”  (Jefferson had previously attacked the Adams administration’s use of the Sedition Act to silence its enemies.)  Jefferson encouraged selective prosecutions, one of which became a landmark in First Amendment history.  Harry Croswell’s The Wasp accused Jefferson of paying pamphleteer James Callender to charge Washington and Adams with various crimes and to refer to Adams as a “hoary-headed incendiary” and Washington as a “traitor, robber, and perjurer.”  In Croswell’s trial for seditious libel, the judge ruled that the truth was not a defense.

    $5,500