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  • (EDGAR ALLAN POE)

    A collection of newspapers with notices of stage performances featuring Poe’s parents. Boston, 1806-1809

    This collection documents the theatrical career of Edgar Allan Poe’s parents David and Eliza.

    $6,800

  • JEFFERSON, THOMAS

    The Writings of Thomas Jefferson … [edited by] Henry A. Washington. Washington: Taylor & Maury, 1853-54

    FIRST EDITION of Jefferson’s writings to attempt to be comprehensive, including his principal essays, papers, and correspondence. This standard edition supersedes the four-volume edition of 1829. Includes a folding facsimile of Jefferson’s original four-page draft of the Declaration of Independence.

    $6,500

  • GOODSPEED’S BOOK SHOP

    An enormous run of Goodspeed’s rare book and manuscript catalogues. Vols. 1-360 and 391-575. Boston: Goodspeed's Book Shop, 1899-1973

    Founded in 1898, Goodspeed’s published its first catalogue in 1899. For decades to come the firm would be a dominant force in American bookselling. These catalogues are a witness to that golden age.

    $6,500

  • Niyaz Ali Beg Nikhat Dihlavi

    Makhzan-i-Fawaid. Delhi, 1845

    This is a rare collection of Hindustani idioms and proverbs with commentary and quotations from Hindustani poets, printed in Urdu with lithography.

    $6,500

  • (LEWIS AND CLARK)

    A collection of newspapers concerning the expedition of Lewis and Clark. Various places, 1803-1838

    A collection of newspapers from the Louisiana Purchase through reports on the expedition and the publication of the account.

    $6,500

  • HAWTHORNE ,NATHANIEL

    Twice-Told Tales. Boston: American Stationers, 1837

    FIRST EDITION of Hawthorne’s second published book, a classic of American literature. From the day of publication this collection of nineteen tales brought Hawthorne fame.

    $6,000

  • (WASHINGTON, BUSHROD.) [Ballow, Henry.]

    A Treatise of Equity … with the addition of marginal references and notes by John Fonblanque. Volume the Second. Dublin: Byrne, Moore, Jones, and Watts, 1795

    Bushrod Washington’s copy, with his signature on the title-page. George Washington’s favorite nephew, Bushrod (1762-1829) was executor of his uncle’s estate and inherited Mount Vernon. He inherited Washington’s library and papers, and this volume was surely shelved side-by-side with those books at Mount Vernon. Bushrod Washington gave John Marshall access to Washington’s papers when the chief justice was writing his Life of Washington.

    $6,000

  • SCHWARTS, Robert N. & TOWNES, Charles H

    Interstellar and Interplanetary Communication by Optical Masers. Washington, February 27, 1961

    PRE-PUBLICATION RARITY. “The classic paper published in Nature that started it all” (coseti.org), this is the founding work of optical SETI. This pre-publication form is dated more than a month before the article’s publication in Nature. For years SETI research focused on radio transmissions, but the development of powerful lasers has made Optical SETI (OSETI) a highly promising area of research. Townes’s prescient proposal is even the more remarkable given the very limited power of masers and lasers at the time this paper appeared.

    $6,000

  • (U.S. CAPITOL.) Photographer unidentified

    East Front of the Capitol. Washington, August 31, 1864

    This rare photograph shows the East Front of the U.S. Capitol during construction. Sawhorses and construction debris are visible in the foreground, while a number of figures, perhaps builders and the architect, stand at the head of the main stairs beneath Thomas Crawford’s pediment of The Progress of Civilization.

    $5,500

  • HAMILTON, ALEXANDER, et al

    The Speeches at Full Length of Mr. Van Ness, Mr. Caines, the Attorney-General, Mr. Harrison, and General Hamilton, in the great cause of the people, against Harry Croswell, on an indictment for a libel on Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States. New York: Waite, 1804

    FIRST EDITION.  Angered by attacks on his administration by Federalist newspapers, Thomas Jefferson decided to use the Sedition Act to “restore the integrity of the press.”  (Jefferson had previously attacked the Adams administration’s use of the Sedition Act to silence its enemies.)  Jefferson encouraged selective prosecutions, one of which became a landmark in First Amendment history.  Harry Croswell’s The Wasp accused Jefferson of paying pamphleteer James Callender to charge Washington and Adams with various crimes and to refer to Adams as a “hoary-headed incendiary” and Washington as a “traitor, robber, and perjurer.”  In Croswell’s trial for seditious libel, the judge ruled that the truth was not a defense.

    $5,500